Authenticity on the Bench

Authenticity on the Bench - Pre Law Flyer

On Monday, February 12, 2018 at 6:30 pm, OUTLaw will be hosting “Authenticity on the Bench.”  The event will feature an intimate conversation with the Hon. Paul G. Feinman, the first openly gay judge to be appointed to the New York Court of Appeals, our state’s highest court.  The event will take place in the Dean Alexander Moot Court (DAMC) room, with a reception to follow.  Authenticity on the Bench is free and open to the public; parking will be available in the senior lot, accessed off Holland Ave.

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Albany Law School Open House for UAlbany Students

The Albany Law School is hosting an Open House just for UAlbany Students on February 9, 2018; Noon to 5pm.

2018 ALS Fair 1

Register Today

2018 ALS Fair.jpg

 

Albany Law School cordially invites
University at Albany students and alumni to Our Open House.
Registration is Required. Click Here to Register.


Friday, February 9, 2018
Noon – 5:00 p.m.

Albany Law School
80 New Scotland Ave.
East Foyer


Agenda:

  • Refreshments
  • Welcome from current students, UAlbany Alums, and remarks from Dean Ouellette
  • Pathways to the Profession
  • Mock Class
  • Student & Faculty Panel
  • Financial Aid
  • Admissions Workshops
  • Reception & Closing Remarks with Faculty and Alumni

Take an optional tour of campus at the beginning or end of the event

About Those Study Skills…

mystory-mondays

MyStory Mondays is a weekly digest of our latest posts.

Our UAlbany MyStory Bloggers share their lives with you to help you to stay focused on your goals, to remind and inform you about the many supports that we have on campus to help you succeed, and to let you know that, whatever you are going through, you are not alone. 

This week we share past posts from our Peer Advisors and our MyStory Volunteers about study habits and study skills. Please add to the list. What works for you? How do you manage your time? 


dog-734689_960_720.jpgLooking for a place to look over your notes before the big test? Are your roommates throwing a party the night before? Can’t find anywhere to settle in the library? Look no further as you’ll learn some of the secret and not-so-secret spots for studying to ensure you get that A you deserve! Click Here for More.

 


The Advising PLUS Tutoring and Study Skill Schedule is Here!
CLICK HERE FOR MORE!


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Last semester, Simonti shared her struggles and successes with time management. Check out her experiences with, what she would describe as, the two sides of time management. Click Here for Side One. Click Here for Side Two.


Sam Broking 3Sam B., has a tool kit for starting well in her post, Starting the Semester Strong. She did not come up with this list by doing a Google search. As an athlete, she learned time management and study skills the hard way. She practices what she preaches and she has benefited from establishing better habits.  It is so easy to get off track.


During Fall 2015, we asked our advisors, peer advisors, and student workers for a list of study tips. If you are a senior, you might recognize some of their names. 

  1. Start Studying now. Do not cram. You will learn more by not procrastinating and this will help you excel with your midterms. – John Donoghue, Assistant Director of ASC
  2. Only focus on the same subject/class for 30 minutes- 1 hour and then switch subjects! – Sam Brookings, Peer Advisor
  3. Use your time wisely and take care of your body. If your health is off-center your focus will not be on the books. – Mayra Raxon, Academic Advisor
  4. Social studying helps! – Anita Ma, Peer Advisor
  5. Breathe and be patient with yourself. Study often rather than waiting and cramming at the last minute.  – Kiara Davis, Work Study Student.
  6. Examine yourself and think about when, where, and with whom you study best. I studied best in a cafeteria/coffee house/book store setting, but when working on a paper, I needed silence so the 2nd or 3rd floor of the library was my hiding place. I could never study in my dorm – never.  – Rachel Moody, Academic Advisor
  7. Try your best and stay positive. You will get through this! – Krystal, Work Study Student
  8. When studying- reward yourself with pre-planned break sessions. For example…”If I learn this chapter’s material, not just read it but keep full focus, receive full comprehension and ensure full confidence in my knowledge for the next 23 minutes, I DESERVE three minutes to eat an apple cider donut and check social media”. If you make it into a game, you will focus less on being overwhelmed and more on challenging yourself to learn the material without the FOMO. – Samantha Miller, Academic Advisor
  9. Stay organized! Keeping track of due dates on one calendar will ensure nothing sneaks up on you! – Nicole Clause, Academic Advisor
  10. Know that it is normal to be stressed right now and that this time will soon pass. Check your syllabi often. Map out your test and assignment due dates so that you are prepared. Knowing what is ahead of you really helps to lower the pressure.  –Barbara Brown, Coordinator of Advising Plus
  11. Remember to take time off for yourself.  – Anonymous Work Study Student
  12. Try to keep up that “first week of school” energy.  It can be easy to start to slack off in the middle of the semester.  Do something fun to celebrate getting this far, then hit the books with a renewed spark! – Amanda Parker, Academic Advisor
  13. Remember that there is a bigger picture – a greater goal that you are working toward!  Do not panic, but do your best.  – Anonymous Work Study Student
  14. Pace yourself! A little studying everyday goes a whole lot further than trying to cram in one night!  – Dr. JoAnne Malatesta, Director of the Advisement Services Center and Assistant Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education

Poster of Genevieve Durso
Genevieve Durso

Advising PLUS Tutoring Spring 2018

teacher-1015630_960_720Spring 2018
A-PLUS Tutoring Schedule by Subject

Sci Lib = Second Floor, Science Library
SSC = State Quad Student Success Center (Second Floor, Whitman Hall)

Advising PLUS can also refer you to many other tutoring resources across campus. If you do not see what you need, contact them! 
Location: Science Library – Second floor | Phone: (518)437-3976
Office Hours: Monday thru Friday; 8:30am to 5pm
E-mail: advisingplus@albany.edu

Subject Course Day Time Location*
Accounting BACC 211 Monday 2:40-3:40pm SSC
BACC 211/222 Wed 12:35-2:35pm Sci Lib
Anthropology AANT 110 Monday 1:40-2:35pm SSC
Art History AARH 171 TBA Before exams TBA
AARH 260 Monday 6:30-7:30pm Sci Lib
Biology ABIO 131

 

 

 

Monday 2:45-3:45pm Sci Lib
Wed 2:45-3:45pm Sci Lib
Wed 7:15-8:15pm Sci Lib
Thursday 11:45am-12:45pm Sci Lib
ABIO 212 Sunday 4:00-5:00pm SSC
ABIO 217 Thursday 4:00-5:00pm SSC
Chemistry ACHM 120/121

 

Monday 12:35-1:30pm Sci Lib
Thursday 5:00-6:00pm SSC
ACHM 220/221 Wed 10:00am-12:00pm Sci Lib
Computer Engineering ICEN 150/200 Sunday 7:00-8:00pm SSC
ICEN 213 Thursday 4:15-5:15pm Sci Lib
Computer Science ICSI 201/210/213/333 Monday 5:00-6:00pm SSC
ICSI 201/210/213/333/405 Tuesday 5:15-7:15pm SSC
Criminal Justice RCRJ 201/202/203 Tuesday 12:00-2:00pm Sci Lib
Economics AECO 110/111 Wed 3:00-5:00pm SSC
All levels Monday 11:30am-12:25pm Sci Lib
Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity CEHC 101/210/242/

321/343/344/345

Tuesday 12:00-2:00pm Sci Lib
History All 100-level courses Tuesday 3:15-4:15pm SSC
Informatics IINF 100X Tuesday 1:30-2:30pm SSC
Mathematics AMAT 106 Sunday 2:00-3:00pm SSC
AMAT 108

 

Tuesday 2:45-3:45pm SSC
Wed 11:30am-12:25pm SSC
AMAT 111/112/113 Thursday 2:15-3:15pm Sci Lib
AMAT 101 through 299 Tuesday 5:15-7:15pm SSC
Physics APHY 105/108 Sunday 3:00-4:00pm SSC
Political Science All levels Tuesday 6:15-7:15pm Sci Lib
Thursday 6:15-7:15pm Sci Lib
Psychology APSY 101

 

 

Sunday 5:00-6:00pm SSC
Tuesday 7:30-8:30pm SSC
Thursday 8:00-9:00pm SSC
APSY 214/314 Tuesday 4:15-5:15pm Sci Lib
All levels

 

 

Monday 10:00am-12:00pm Sci Lib
Tuesday 2:00-3:00pm Sci Lib
Wed 12:00-1:00pm Sci Lib
Public Administration RPAD 140/302 Sunday 2:00-3:00pm SSC
Sociology ASOC 115 Tuesday 12:30-1:30pm SSC
Spanish Up to ASPN 208 Wed 4:00-5:00pm SSC
All levels Tuesday 7:15-8:15pm Sci Lib
Study Skills All levels

 

 

Tuesday 1:30-2:30pm Sci Lib
Tuesday 4:15-5:15pm SSC
Wed 4:00-5:00pm Sci Lib
Online
Tutoring
CLICK HERE
  • Writing – Any level
    (except foreign language)
  • Math
  • General Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • General Biology
  • Anatomy & Physiology
  • Physics
  • Psychology
  • Economics (Macro/Micro)
  • Computer Science
  • Accounting – Any level
 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday through Thursday
7:00 pm to Midnight

 

 

 

 

Welcome Back UAlbany Danes

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Need an Advisor? Just Come in!

This week, the Advisement Services Center is open for walk-ins from 8:30am to 5pm.  We are not taking any appointments, just come in, swipe in at the kiosk, and an advisor will meet with you.

If you need help with finding a resource; with adding, swapping, or dropping a class; with finding a class; or some other general question, have no fear. Our Peer Advisors are here!

Our Peer Advisors will be here to serve you this week, at the following times:

  • Tuesday –  10am to 11:30am; 12pm to 5pm
  • Wednesday – 9am to 5pm
  • Thursday – 10am to 11:30am; 12:30pm to 5pm
  • Friday – 9am – 12:30pm

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Credit available for RSSW 190 – 1 Credit 35 Hours of Service
On Wednesday, April 18, UAlbany’s Project MyStory and Skribblers will host a storytelling conference for a 5th grade class from our local community. This conference will focus on identity.  The children are quite excited! We are seeking volunteers to prepare the storytelling “stations” and to work with the students on the day of the conference. If you are interested in participating, please contact Rachel Moody at rsmoody@albany.edu


Some Project MyStory inspiration for your first week of classes:

From Zero Point Five to Hero

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All throughout high school I would have considered myself a certified slacker. Procrastination is one of my biggest weaknesses and is something I have struggled with my whole schooling career, including now. The idea of doing school work days before it was due didn’t appeal to me much especially if there was something better I could be doing with my time. The ticking hours before a deadline was my motivation to power through an assignment or study for a test. In spite of this, I wasn’t always handing in quality work, rushing to finish in time. I knew I could do better if I tried, but my laziness pulled me into doing the bare minimum. Due to my good memory and test taking skills I was able to slide by in high school despite missing home works and handing in assignments late. I often think that if I had put the effort into my high school classes that I put into my work now, I would be going to Harvard. One of the biggest challenges a student experiences when transitioning into college is the work load.

“A 0.5 was the number
I read to my parents when
they asked about my GPA.”
   

When I arrived here, I didn’t realize how important it was to do all assignments, to go to all classes, and to study for all tests in clock-iconadvance. I would miss an assignment and brush it off, thinking it wouldn’t impact my grade THAT much. There was one time I missed a test because I didn’t feel like leaving bed. It’s just one test right? My attitude towards college school work reflected that of high school. I didn’t even realize I was so far behind in school until I returned home at the end of the semester and received my grades. A 0.5 was the number I read to my parents when they asked about my GPA. I felt like a complete failure letting my parents down. I had to beg for a second chance for weeks as my parents weren’t going to let me go back the following semester. By the time I finally convinced them to let me return my mind was set that I had to take my education seriously. It took a little time to figure out the best ways to perform in school but with a little hard work my grades slowly improved. The best advice I can give any new students is to not fall behind. It’s been really tough digging myself out of the hole I was in and all because of a mistake I made one semester. Although this experience was a setback it’s taught me a lot about myself and what I am capable of doing if I put my mind to something.

Here are some tips on how to stay on top of your work I’ve learned through my personal struggle with school.

  • Go to class. I can’t stress how important this is. Even if there’s no attendance and even if you really don’t want to go, push yourself to. When you go to class and pay attention to what is being taught it makes easier to study because you actually learned what you’re about to take a test on. Also going to class gives you the opportunity to meet other students in the class and it’s always beneficial to have a friend in a class. You can study the material together and help each other learn the subject if one of you are confused.
  • Don’t cram. Putting off studying till the last minute is setting yourself up for failure. When you are rushed you don’t take the time to fully understand all of the material as you are more focused getting through it all. Study throughout the week a little bit at a time and save yourself from sitting in the library for hours the night before a test. This is the same for papers and other assignments. You’re more likely to get a good grade on a paper if it’s done correctly and well developed.
  • Go to office hours. If you are confused with something that you are learning stop by office hours and talk to your professors. They are there to help you and they really want. With how big UAlbany is it’s easier understand something one on one instead of in a lecture hall filled with hundreds of people.
  • Utilize the library. I know the library isn’t the most appealing place but even if you go for a short amount of time you’re more likely to get all your work done there than anywhere else. It’s also reassuring to know that the people around you are also working hard.
  • Practice your study habits. Every person learns things in their own way. Sometime you don’t know which way works best for you unless you try different things. There many different studying methods from everything from a quizlet to flashcards, or even making up songs in your head.

College is only 4 years and it’s hard to lose sight of school with everything going on around you. It’s important to enjoy this time of your life because it will only happen once but it’s also important to work hard for your future.


melissa-ferringMelissa F.
Class of 2018
Majors: Spanish & Communication
Blog Theme: Fierce & Freaked 

Please Note: The views of our student bloggers do not necessarily reflect the views of the UAlbany Advisement Services Center. These are their stories and their voices.

 

Job and Internship Fair on February 14

UAlbany’s Job & Internship Fair is on February 14, 2018 in the SEFCU Arena from 12 – 5 pm

The Career Fair is open to ALL MAJORS and will have a range of employers from all industries; non-profit, healthcare, government, technology, education, business, science….etc. looking to hire students for internships and entry level positions opportunities. Do not miss this great opportunity to network with over 100 employers and find out what opportunities await after graduation. If you have not already started now is the time to think about life after college. Check out and learn about the employers that have registered so far https://albany.joinhandshake.com/career_fairs/3578 and stay tuned for career and professional development workshops and events leading up to the career fair.

2018 Career Fair

 

MLK on the Purpose of Education

The Advisement Services Center will be closed on Monday, January 15, 2018 in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. 

Martin-luther-king-quotes-on-education1

The Purpose Of Education

by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,
Morehouse College Student Paper, The Maroon Tiger, in 1947

As I engage in the so-called “bull sessions” around and about the school, I too often find that most college men have a misconception of the purpose of education. Most of the “brethren” think that education should equip them with the proper instruments of exploitation so that they can forever trample over the masses. Still others think that education should furnish them with noble ends rather than means to an end.

It seems to me that education has a two-fold function to perform in the life of man and in society: the one is utility and the other is culture. Education must enable a man to become more efficient, to achieve with increasing facility the legitimate goals of his life.

Education must also train one for quick, resolute and effective thinking. To think incisively and to think for one’s self is very difficult. We are prone to let our mental life become invaded by legions of half truths, prejudices, and propaganda. At this point, I often wonder whether or not education is fulfilling its purpose. A great majority of the so-called educated people do not think logically and scientifically. Even the press, the classroom, the platform, and the pulpit in many instances do not give us objective and unbiased truths. To save man from the morass of propaganda, in my opinion, is one of the chief aims of education. Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction.

The function of education, therefore, is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. But education which stops with efficiency may prove the greatest menace to society. The most dangerous criminal may be the man gifted with reason, but with no morals.

The late Eugene Talmadge, in my opinion, possessed one of the better minds of Georgia, or even America. Moreover, he wore the Phi Beta Kappa key. By all measuring rods, Mr. Talmadge could think critically and intensively; yet he contends that I am an inferior being. Are those the types of men we call educated?

We must remember that intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character–that is the goal of true education. The complete education gives one not only power of concentration, but worthy objectives upon which to concentrate. The broad education will, therefore, transmit to one not only the accumulated knowledge of the race but also the accumulated experience of social living.

If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. Be careful, “brethren!” Be careful, teachers!

Taken from http://www.drmartinlutherkingjr.com/thepurposeofeducation.htm.


What is Your Life’s Blueprint?

The Other Part of Time Management

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A large part of being a student is not being a student.

I remember storming through Spring semester. When it came time for summer, I really had no clue what to do. It kind of felt like I forgot who I was and everything I did on my free time because I was so wired up to work like a machine. I remember going to the library and reading books nonstop for a couple of weeks because I had a strong feeling that I needed to keep working and I felt guilty when I was not doing anything, even though there was absolutely nothing to do.

Being a student in college calls for amazing time management skills and endless hours of actively studying and working to succeed, but it also calls for breaks, which is something we usually neglect to do while the semester is in session.

Breaks are great to prevent semester burn outs. Now that I am in my junior year, I have realized a pattern that I have been following: For fall semesters, coming back from months of doing absolutely nothing, I usually stay on my toes until midterm point and begin to burn out right before because I get exhausted, causing me to do terrible on midterms and then spend the rest of the semester stressing and trying to get back on track by overworking. This usually ends horribly. Spring semesters, I usually start off slow because I am exhausted from my previous semester’s shenanigans, which helps me regulate breaks for myself right from the beginning so that I can easily prevent the mid semester burnout.

Taking breaks and knowing when to take them are a powerful tools for your academic achievements. These breaks also help you to remember who you are, while striving to be an A grade machine. It takes me forever to remember who I am all over again after spring semesters because I spend so much time away from being myself or when there is time I am usually too exhausted to do anything.

We are not our Grades poster
Spring 2016 Tabling – Now This Poster is FILLED!

Even though it sounds really easy to take a break, figuring out when to take a break when there is barely any time to finish work as is is really tricky. A lot of my free time ends up being wasted lying in bed before school dreading to start my day; falling asleep in the Science library, while trying to get work done between my classes; or laying down, after school, unable to move from the exhaustion.

time mgmt fail

In my last blog post, I talked about time management, mostly in the sense of not procrastinating and getting work done efficiently, but there is a great deal of time management that goes behind taking breaks. To allow myself to take breaks, I need to finish all of the work I have planned for that day or for the week, so that I do not ruin my “break day” by stressing our about work I still have to get done. Setting myself up to look forward to things is a technique I use to make myself finish my work faster, instead of moping around. The thought of working hard now and being able to relax later at a set date for an event always makes me work a ton more efficiently.

Breaks are not something I am good at managing. Sometimes I am really good with self-control, and allowing myself to get back to work after a day or two of stepping away from school work, but sometimes I do not get back to the world of homework and studying. This sometimes results in me not taking breaks at all for a couple of months, in order to catch up. Doesn’t that sound stressful.

Figuring out how to balance a social life, school, sleep and pretty much everything is something I have been trying to do since starting college. Sure I have improved a lot, and I do not end my semesters scarred for life and hating myself anymore. Still, I could really improve my efficiency by a ton, if I keep trying to figure out what is not working for me. This is something I strive to continue doing. I am getting better and better.


Please Note: The views of our student bloggers do not necessarily reflect the views of the UAlbany Advisement Services Center. These are their stories and their voices.
About the Author:

DSC_1440

Simonti B.
Class of 2019
Majors: Biology and English
Past Blog Theme:
Writing My Own Chapter

Current Theme:
Resolutionary

The New Global Distinction Program

Global Distinction Program Flyer

Global Distinction Demos:
Follow your Major towards Global Competence

Undergraduate students, pursuing any Major, come learn how you can make the most of your University at Albany degree, graduate globally competent and on time! Let us guide you through your unique combination of

  1. Interdisciplinary globally focused coursework,
  2. 2 years of foreign language study, and
  3. International immersion (a study abroad semester and an 8-10 week internship or research placement abroad), so that you enter today’s dynamic multicultural workplaces with Global Distinction.

Be Here Now!

Tuesday, 12/5
2:30-3:30pm
The Bean (Campus Center Expansion, downstairs)

Wednesday, 12/6
12:30-1:30pm
Board Room (Campus Center Expansion, upstairs)
Thursday, 12/7
10:30-11:30am
The Bean (Campus Center Expansion, downstairs)
CLICK HERE to learn more!

Click here to check out the Global Distinction Flyer.