My New Motto

mystory-what-are-you-going-to-do-with-that-major

Life in the humanities can be a struggle sometimes. Whether it is your parents who do not support what you are doing, or friends who think you should studying something more “reliable,” majoring in this field brings along headaches. I understand. As a matter of fact, there are several groups of people who understand the self-doubt that starts to build when people, who you thought were your biggest supporters, become your fiercest obstacles. I say this in the most respectful way possible since these people mean so much to me, but in all honesty, no one should stand in the way of you and your happiness or success. I am learning that there are many people who have felt the same way and are now thriving in their respective fields. Continue reading “My New Motto”

Majors and Audits – Come on Over!

mystory-what-are-you-going-to-do-with-that-majorWhat are you going to do with that Major?

If you are thinking about a major in the Humanities (English, Philosophy, History, Art, Music, Theatre, the Classics, Languages etc.), we have two workshops planned with you in mind! Mondays, February 27 and March 8, at 6:30pm in Humanities Room 354


degree-auditWhat do you need in order to graduate?

Registration Season is about to begin! Are you ready? Does DARS mean anything to you? Come and review your degree audit with our Peer Advisors. Wednesday, March 1 at 6:30pm in the Advisement Services Center, located next to the staircase in front of the Main Library.

Majoring in Sociology?

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Get the Most out of Your Sociology Degree

Opportunities for Mentored Research, Advanced Study and Applied Learning
Wednesday, February 22, 4:30 to 6:00 p.m
Sociology Department Conference Room, 3rd Floor, Arts & Sciences

Join faculty members from the sociology department who will tell you about the departmental Honors Program, Internship Program, our joint BA/MA program, and how to get involved with our local chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta, the national Sociology honors society .

Building a Career with a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology
Monday, February 27, 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Sociology Department Conference Room, 3rd Floor, Arts & Sciences

So what are you going to do with that?” is a question sociology majors hear regularly. We will be participating in a webinar put on by the American Sociological Association that brings together young professionals who studied sociology will describe their current positions and offer advice to current undergraduates on preparing for the job market, job searches, and interviews. Dr. Teresa Ciabattari will also present recent findings regarding the kinds of skills and knowledge today’s employers seek and how departments can help position students for employment success.
All students are welcome to attend either, or both, discussions.
Refreshments will be served.

Are you Undecided? You are not alone.

You are invited to come to a workshop designed to give you the tools to make decisions about your academic path and your career. If you are undecided about your major and you need some help, we hope to see you soon! Continue reading “Are you Undecided? You are not alone.”

MLK on the Purpose of Education

The Advisement Services Center will be closed on Monday, January 16, 2017, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. 

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The Purpose Of Education

by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,
Morehouse College Student Paper, The Maroon Tiger, in 1947

As I engage in the so-called “bull sessions” around and about the school, I too often find that most college men have a misconception of the purpose of education. Most of the “brethren” think that education should equip them with the proper instruments of exploitation so that they can forever trample over the masses. Still others think that education should furnish them with noble ends rather than means to an end.
It seems to me that education has a two-fold function to perform in the life of man and in society: the one is utility and the other is culture. Education must enable a man to become more efficient, to achieve with increasing facility the legitimate goals of his life.

Education must also train one for quick, resolute and effective thinking. To think incisively and to think for one’s self is very difficult. We are prone to let our mental life become invaded by legions of half truths, prejudices, and propaganda. At this point, I often wonder whether or not education is fulfilling its purpose. A great majority of the so-called educated people do not think logically and scientifically. Even the press, the classroom, the platform, and the pulpit in many instances do not give us objective and unbiased truths. To save man from the morass of propaganda, in my opinion, is one of the chief aims of education. Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction.

The function of education, therefore, is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. But education which stops with efficiency may prove the greatest menace to society. The most dangerous criminal may be the man gifted with reason, but with no morals.

The late Eugene Talmadge, in my opinion, possessed one of the better minds of Georgia, or even America. Moreover, he wore the Phi Beta Kappa key. By all measuring rods, Mr. Talmadge could think critically and intensively; yet he contends that I am an inferior being. Are those the types of men we call educated?

We must remember that intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character–that is the goal of true education. The complete education gives one not only power of concentration, but worthy objectives upon which to concentrate. The broad education will, therefore, transmit to one not only the accumulated knowledge of the race but also the accumulated experience of social living.

If we are not careful, our colleges will produce a group of close-minded, unscientific, illogical propagandists, consumed with immoral acts. Be careful, “brethren!” Be careful, teachers!

Taken from http://www.drmartinlutherkingjr.com/thepurposeofeducation.htm.

The Minor Problem with Picking a Major

So here’s the deal. You graduate high school and go to college for 4 years, studying so that you can get the degree of your choice, so that you can get a job with that degree, so that you can provide for yourself and the family you’ll eventually have and so that one day you can send your kids to college. It’s the circle of life, how beautiful. Not. Not for me at least. You see I unfortunately wasn’t blessed with knowing exactly what I want to do with my life. There are some people, actually many people who come into college fully aware of what path they want to take in. This benefits them in many ways, the biggest being that they are able to plan. Plan what classes to take, what grad schools to look into, what internships to apply for. Continue reading “The Minor Problem with Picking a Major”

The Life and Times of an Invisible Student

In 2012 at the ripe old age of forty-eight, I lost my mind — or so some folks would have me think — and returned to school as a student at Hudson Valley Community College. I hadn’t stopped to consider my age or the fact that I had been away from school for over thirty years. I just jumped in with both feet and took up a full schedule of classes.

classroom-379214_960_720   My first semester consisted of evening and off-campus classes so I was not so unusual as a few others were also over forty. It was sometime during my third semester as a student at Hudson Valley that I realized that I was invisible. Not in a literal sense but in a figurative sense. By this time I was taking classes on campus during the day. Now I WAS pretty much the only one of my age in my classes — sometimes even the instructor was younger.  I did well in my classes and made the President’s List, but outside of classes I was a non-entity. There are no groups for a student of a non-traditional age. All of the activities are geared towards the younger crowd that make up the majority of the student population and often assignments are geared towards the eighteen to twenty-five year old set.

invisible-man-154567_960_720  At this point I must digress and tell readers a bit about myself. I graduated from HVCC with honors and transferred to UAlbany two years ago where I am now a History Major and English Minor with U.S. History being my concentration. I am a commuter student who doesn’t live anywhere near campus and I have a life outside of being a full-time college student.

With all of this in mind I am also excited to be a part of the MyStory project. FINALLY! There is a place where I don’t have to be invisible! I can share my triumphs and my woes with anyone else out there who is over thirty and invisible! I hope my writings will help others who may be feeling alone in a sea of traditionally college aged students. Maybe some traditional students will read my work and tell a parent or an aunt or uncle that they, too, CAN achieve a dream of going back to school. My main hope is that by writing about my experiences I will be able to help someone to feel like they are not alone and their experiences and struggles are not entirely unique.


phoebePhoebe E. 
Class of 2016
Major: History
Minor: English
Blog Theme: Trials and Triumphs 
of a Non-Traditional Student... 

Please Note: The views of our student bloggers do not necessarily reflect the views of the UAlbany Advisement Services Center. These are their stories and their voices.

Meet Tendrina: Communication & Journalism Major

tendrina

  1. What is your major and why did you choose it?

I’m a double major in communications and journalism. I chose it because of my career aspirations, because of my love for media, and because I’m awful at math and science.

  1. How do people react when you tell them what your major is?

Depends. Most of the time I get a pretty positive reaction because I’m a double major and people tell me that I was meant to work in those fields.

  1. What do people perceive is the most popular or “well-known” career for your major?

Journalist or public relations agent.

  1. What do you think of the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

I think it’s a very loaded question. What does that refer to? What do I want to be professionally? What do I want to be in the eyes of others? What do I want to be in the world? And what does “when you grow up” mean? Continue reading “Meet Tendrina: Communication & Journalism Major”

UAlbanese and the L Sees: Deciphering Frequently Used Terms for a Successful Semester

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parkingDay One: You call ahead to find out where to park. “Not in the circle; students park in Gold Parking,” says a voice on the other end. Super. Too bad you have no idea where either are. When you arrive, you find an empty spot close to campus because you have arrived early. What a relief. You look over your schedule one last time; it’s a strange LC number, but no buildings say ‘LC’ on the outside. A student, who looks a little more experienced than you, tells you to take the tunnels to the L Sees, or  you can ask the students at The Podium. There is no sign for either anywhere and the UAlbany map looks more like a small city rather than a school. Everyone tells you that you will get used to it after day one, but then day one comes to a close and you find a warning on your car about your parking. Apparently that wasn’t Gold Parking.  

Parlez-vous UAlbanese?

Sometimes we take for granted that we are speaking UAlbanese, using institutional lingo that gets lost in translation. Here are  some explanations of just a few terms to help ease your transition into UAlbany:  Continue reading “UAlbanese and the L Sees: Deciphering Frequently Used Terms for a Successful Semester”