MyStory Mondays 10-23-17 Adjusting

mystory-mondays

MyStory Mondays is a weekly digest of our latest posts.

Our UAlbany MyStory Bloggers share their lives with you to help you to stay focused on your goals, to remind and inform you about the many supports that we have on campus to help you succeed, and to let you know that, whatever you are going through, you are not alone. 

This week, we are focusing on adjusting socially and academically.

Elizabeth B
Click on the Pic to Read More about Liz’s Journey at UAlbany
Anik Pic.JPG
Click here to read about how Anik addressed his social fears.
When I was in a large group, I was afraid people would judge me. I would ask myself the same set of random questions in my head every time I was around a lot of people. “Is there something in my teeth?” “Is there a stain on my clothes?” “Does my breath smell okay?”

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In her last post, Simonti shared her love of music, especially Hindi music.  This week, she writes about how music had become a distraction and how she wrenched herself from her addiction to sound. Click here to read more. 

Music has always found a way to make me feel more excited about doing whatever it was I had to do. It made my life more colorful. There are certain songs, in which, I have a period of my life stored. This is something no picture or book has ever been able to do. I have been the type of person that always needed a song playing in the background, anything, just to avoid having to be without a tune. But there was a problem…

Navigating RoomHATE

 

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Kate Engert offers several steps to addressing difficult roommate situations, in her post, “Navigating RoomHATE.”  This post was part of her MyStory blog series, Metamorphosis. Click here to read her offerings.

Alex J Project MyStory 2015
Alex went through almost everything. Click on the image to read her story.

Want more stories? Click here.


Plugging Our Friends:
Check out Great Danes Daily: The UAlbany Dept. of Communication Student Blog.  You can also follow them on twitter @gr8danesdaily.
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Social Resolutions

Have you ever seen a person you know from school in public and tried your best to avoid them so you do not have to greet them and make conversation with them? That was me from middle school until the beginning of 12th grade. I hated social situations. I preferred being in smaller groups of people I knew. Being in a social situation would make me very anxious and extremely fidgety. I would not know what to do with myself. When I was in a large group, I was afraid people would judge me. I would ask myself the same set of random questions in my head every time I was around a lot of people. “Is there something in my teeth?” “Is there a stain on my clothes?” “Does my breath smell okay?” Continue reading “Social Resolutions”

It’s About the Little Wins

 

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College can be an incredibly tumultuous time for people, filled with high highs and low lows. The school year can be so stressful. Between homework, studying for tests, working, going to class, and having a social life; it is hard to remain sane. Although it is important to keep your grades up and remain diligent, you also have to keep your mental and emotional well-being in check. This is way easier said, than done. Continue reading “It’s About the Little Wins”

Keeping up with Long Distance

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Moving away from home involves a lot more than experiencing a new place, living with new people, and starting a new life. Everything is new but there is some aspect of the old that you want to keep, such as your friendships and relationships back at home. When I moved away I found it to be refreshing that I could easily drop those toxic relationships that were detrimental to my well-being, but it was worse that I could not see the people I truly cared about as often as I wanted to. It was definitely a difficult transition but I learned some tips on how to maintain those relationships when I was away.

  1. Communication

Simple enough, we’ve got to communicate. I know that it’s not the same as face to face but thank goodness we have Face Time and cell phones to communicate with each other. It’s such a blessing that we can call whenever the time is right. Our lives get pretty hectic, but setting aside the time to talk to those you care about is incredibly important.

  1. Share Moments

You don’t always have to set aside a time for a full on phone conversation. Take pictures of those moments that make you happy during your day and send them to your friends and family. Snapchat is perfect for this. Then, when your friends and family have the time, they can respond and enjoy that moment with you.

  1. Embrace Your Tears

It’s evident that when we miss people, we cry, and that’s okay. As long as you cope with the sadness in a healthy manner, this can only make your relationships stronger because it shows that you care. To cope, try joining a group on campus and having a support group. Go to the Counseling and Psychological services or call the Middle Earth Hotline. Write out your feelings or sing a sad song. This can only strengthen your relationships.

  1. Always Have Your Next Get-Together Planned

We have weekends and breaks during the semester for a reason, so we can go home! Mark it on your calendar and plan out who you are going to see as soon as you get home and what you are going to do with them. This can lessen that tensed feeling you get when you don’t see someone for a long period of time.

  1. Keep Yourself Busy

I know this may sound like a step back from maintaining a long distance relationship but when you’re busy and your people back at home are busy, there will be less worry on your shoulders when you send a text and don’t get a response right away. It can also keep you moving in that direction you are headed in, the reason you did move away.

The most amazing thing about long distance is that when you have this space between you and your circle of friends back at home, you begin to realize who is really there for you and who is not. You’ll begin to see who contributes to that effort you’re putting out to stay in contact and who isn’t. You may even find yourself not wanting to contribute to a previous relationship when you move away and meet new people. This change is good, because you are discovering who you are and what you want in your life. As for the people you’re missing right now, they want to see you succeed as much as you do. So stick it out for them and for you. You are a strong individual and you’ve got this down.


Please Note: The views of our student bloggers do not necessarily reflect the views of the UAlbany Advisement Services Center. These are their stories  – their voices.
About the Author:
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Elizabeth B.
Class of 2018
Major: Communication
Minor: Art
Blog Theme: Homebody for Everybody

Going into Freshman Year

“High school graduation day was a very exciting day at my house because I was going to be the first in my family to hold a degree achieved in America.”

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The end of Senior year of high school is a very exciting time for almost all of us. The weather is getting nicer, graduation is fast approaching, and you have chosen what college you will be attending in the fall. This was me at the end of senior year in high school. I was very relaxed. The workload was winding down quite a bit which meant more free time and more hanging out with my friends. High school graduation day was a very exciting day at my house because I was going to be the first in my family to hold a degree achieved in America. That summer, before freshman year of college, was one of the best summers I had. I got lots of travelling done and spent a lot of time with my friends before classes started. Towards the end of summer, I made a resolution to myself, that I would focus, study hard, and not procrastinate so that I could achieve exceptional grades. I thought that since I was having a very relaxed summer, I would be able to focus better once school started.

The summer flew by and before I knew it, the first day of my freshman year at the University at Albany had arrived. I looked forward to starting this new chapter of my life, but at the same time, I was very nervous since I was a new student at a huge, confusing campus. Little did I know that freshman year was going to be a year of many ups and downs. From what I have seen, freshman year of college does not go as planned for many people, and that was the case with me as well. Continue reading “Going into Freshman Year”

MyStory Mondays 6-26-17

mystory-mondays

MyStory Mondays is a weekly digest of our latest posts.
We are all done for the semester, but we are going to go back in time and share some posts that, we hope, will be useful to our new Danes!

ORIENTATION SEASON BEGINS TODAY!
Welcome New Danes!

New Danes: Make sure to complete your course request form and register for Orientation at www.albany.edu/welcome.
Click here for frequently asked questions about Frosh scheduling.

This week’s installment of MyStory Mondays focuses on the idea of home. We hope that UAlbany becomes your home away from home. Check out the stories from students who, though very differently, found comfort and peace right here.

Jackson Heights. Picture from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Jackson_Heights_1.jpg 

My home is always crowded and filled with some polite and some rude strangers but many familiar faces. Music is always loud in my house; sometimes it’s Spanish, sometimes it’s something indistinguishable, sometimes it’s whatever’s playing too loudly from the headphones off the dude next to me. The TV is always blaring- somewhere. And if you listen just close enough in the summer, you’ll always hear a basketball bouncing, a horn blowing, and a couple having an argument. My house is known to party a little bit too hard and a lot bit too loud but in my opinion, its endless epicness.

If you were to ask me where my home is, I would say to you that it is New York City.

When I think of home, I think of the Rufus King Park where I spent my childhood trying to learn how to ride a bike without training wheels (I’ve yet to learn by the way.) and how the walk to school would be a killer in the winter snow. I think of the students bullying me in elementary school and teachers not doing anything about it and how I would end up sitting next to my teacher on every school trip because I didn’t have friends. I think of switching schools and being put in the top honors classes where I took classes years ahead my grade level. Jackson Heights; where I bought my first cell phone and the Queens Center Mall where my mum bought me my first skinny jeans (after great debate haha). But the best of it all- I think of Forest Hills high school. Read More from Simonti Banik’s MyStory Series, “Writing My Own Chapter


Liz Powe
Click here to Read Liz’s Story

melissa-ferring

Freedom is a beautiful thing. It can also be a dangerous thing. Growing up in my household could be suffocating at times. My dad is a hard worker who, because of his job, has seen what real dangers exist in the world, dangers a teenage girl like me never take seriously. Because of this my dad was very protective of me and my siblings, tracking our phones and constantly checking in on us. It made him hard to talk to when all it seemed like he was doing was ruining my fun. My mom went along with whatever my dad decided, often acting as the enforcer of my dad’s rules. It made it hard to experience anything and it definitely made me naïve. Click Here to Read More.

Transfer Tuesdays V

TODAY is Transfer Advisement Day! 

WELCOME TO UALBANY

If you are here, please comment below and say, “Hello!”


9a42c81259d79d0ceaea80c392c3cf4aWelcome to UAlbany!

As you are preparing to begin the next leg of your academic journey here, we want to share some useful and fun information to help you transition to your new educational home.

Every Tuesday, we will share one or two personal stories from our transfer students, along with information from advisors that we think would be helpful. 

It is always a great day to be a Great Dane!
The Advisement Services Center Team


Make sure to check out the Welcome Page. The Welcome Page has information about housing, registration, health forms, billing and more. Please MAKE SURE to submit all of your health information before August 1.


Last week, we introduced Jeniva Austin, a Transfer Transition Leader and one of our former MyStory Volunteers. Here is part II of her story:

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Jeniva Austin – Picture by Micheal Geroux

The social aspect of college is something people try to make seem unimportant but it plays a bigger role than people like to admit. It is not easy being a new student on campus, and it is even harder being a new student, and going to a school where you do not already have friends. College is not like high school where there may be maybe  just over one hundred students in your grade. It is more like thousands depending on what college you decide to attend. And being a transfer student definitely makes entering a new school so much more complicated. You are not THE new kid but you become just another new kid. Like myself…

As a transfer student, there is a great chance you will be place on Alumni quad. And if you have friends like mine, then you will hear that it really sucks to have to live “off campus.” But what students who are not transfers do not know is that, although Alumni quad is filled with transfer students, and about 10-12 minutes away from the main campus, Alumni quad is for students like me – students like us!  It is for students who come into a school with few  or no friends and not really sure how to get involved. On Alumni quad, they build a community for the transfer student population, and from what I know now, a lot of incoming transfers tend to enjoy living there.

When I first transferred to the University at Albany, I was so excited to have been placed on colonial quad. That meant that I did not have to worry about traveling to the main campus in the morning for class, and I didn’t have to worry about how I would get to take my mini-naps in-between classes. But along with all the pros of living in the main campus quads, there came cons. I was placed in a suite where one triple-room was filled with friends who knew each other from back home, and a roommate who had friends and plans of her own. So as anyone would, I got lonely and kind of annoyed with not having people to go to different events with. This lead to me going home every weekend and a pretty empty bank account due to all of those Trailways tickets I had to buy in order to go back and forth. And let me not forget that, because I usually didn’t have someone to go to the dining hall with, I ordered out VERY often during the week. So my first semester at UAlbany was not the best, but being able to realize that I wanted to be involved, helped me make my spring semester so much more worth transferring here.

In the spring, I got hired as a resident assistant and managed to make a few friends and even go out with people, I would not, normally, hang with on a regular day. I stopped going home every weekend and started to enjoy being in Albany more. I  even applied to be a Transfer Transition Leader (TTL), and got the job! A TTL is a resource for transfers, helping them adjust to socially and academically to the university. Many people asked why I wanted to be a TTL, since I was not an active transfer student during my first semester, but I believe that I could be of help to new incoming transfers that could resonate with me and my story.


Are YOU Coming to one of our Transfer Advising Days?
June 20 | August 1 | August 22 | August 24
If not, you may miss out on the
August 25 Transfer Orientation!

This does not apply if you have already
connected 
with your academic advisor
and have made your schedule.


Click Here for the 2017
Transfer Orientation Guidebook

MyStory Mondays 6-19-17

mystory-mondays

MyStory Mondays is a weekly digest of our latest posts.
We are all done for the semester, but we are going to go back in time and share some posts that, we hope, will be useful to our new Danes!
New Danes – Make sure to complete your course request form and register for Orientation at www.albany.edu/welcome.

This week’s installment of MyStory Mondays focuses on identity.  As you gain more knowledge about the world and become exposed to information that will help shape your future, you are also developing – shape-shifting in amazing ways. This is a time to decide who you are and who you want to be. Several students have shared what this growth was like for them. Check it out!

Find out more about our students and how college has impacted their personal growth my clicking on the pictures below.

Brittany Newell


Franshelis 2017


The following two stories were posted by UAlbany Student Affairs on their Facebook Page. Click on the photos for more and like their page!

Chill

“I am a first generation college student. I attribute my success to myself, but mostly to my mother. She was a single mother who raised me and my brother and I watched her break her back to make sure we had everything we needed to get through life…
Click here for more.


 

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“The Honors College is fun. It fits me. I’ve come to appreciate the community of like-minded people. There’s this perception that school only teaches you what you need to know to work in the real world. People don’t look enough at how schools shape people as human beings…
Click here for more.

Transfer Tuesdays IV

Our Next Transfer Advisement Day is Tuesday, June 20. Will You Be There?


9a42c81259d79d0ceaea80c392c3cf4aWelcome to UAlbany!

As you are preparing to begin the next leg of your academic journey here, we want to share some useful and fun information to help you transition to your new educational home.

Every Tuesday, we will share one or two personal stories from our transfer students, along with information from advisors that we think would be helpful. 

It is always a great day to be a Great Dane!
The Advisement Services Center Team


Make sure to check out the Welcome Page. The Welcome Page has information about housing, registration, health forms, billing and more. Please MAKE SURE to submit all of your health information before August 1.


Meet Jeniva Austin

jeniva-austin-1.jpgJeniva volunteered for Project MyStory in Spring 2017 and she is currently a Transfer Transition Leader. This is Part I of her story:

When I got accepted to the University at Albany, I knew things would be different. Transferring from a community college where everyone knew each other, even if they were not friends; having no lecture halls, more one-on-one time with professors, and a smaller environment, were all things things that I knew would change with my big step into university life. But there were some things I had not realized would happen.

When I first arrived at UAlbany, I was nervous, but I did not want my mom to know. She’s the ‘okay pack your things up, you can just go to school back home’ kind of parent. But I wanted to step out of my comfort zone, and I was not going to let a little anxiety change that. So when it came time to go to class, I made sure to sit somewhere in-between the first three rows. Second row… third seat to be exact. It was my birth date,  2/3, so I never forgot my unassigned, “assigned” seat. I decided that no matter how hard I thought a class was, I would do everything in my power to pass.  I was not going to let the title “university” scare me into thinking that I did not have what it took to succeed. But you see, when I got accepted to the university, the week before classes began, I was placed on a sophomore quad. So that ultimately left me out of the loop when it came to transfer events, which lead to me not attended any transfer events… not even our orientation. While most transfers were gathering to hear all about the resources and cool things the university has for them, I was making my schedule.

Are YOU Coming to one of our Transfer Advising Days?
June 20 | August 1 | August 22 | August 24
If not, you may miss out on the
August 25 Transfer Orientation!

This does not apply if you have already
connected 
with your academic advisor
and have made your schedule.

 

Meeting Rachel Moody, my academic advisor, goes down as one of the coolest days here at UAlbany. She was upbeat, honest, and very passionate about helping me figure everything out. That quickly changed to the worst day I had at the university, the moment she pulled out my degree audit and told me that I was not graduating in two years, like I had planned to. She started asking me questions like, why did I come to UAlbany? Why did I want to study psychology? What was the rush on graduating? And what other fields could I see myself in? These were all questions I thought I knew the answers to, up until I was sitting in front of her. After my meeting with her I was done before I had even started and wanted nothing more than to figure out how I would get the credits I needed to graduate in May 2018. I told myself that I was going take the regular 15 credits my first semester, and start to add extra classes to my schedule every semester after that… Boy did I lie to myself.

Somehow I managed to make it through the fall semester with a few ups and downs in my classes, maybe only four weekends spent here in Albany… and oh, I became a resident assistant. So there I was, in the spring semester: a new RA and only taking twelve credits. So, not only did I not take the extra classes I said I would when I first got here, but I was taking less. My mom was so excited that I got the RA position, she ignored the fact that I was now another three credits behind.

I know a lot of you are probably wondering how this story ties back to me being a transfer student… but it does. The moment I decided to schedule my classes at Transfer Orientation, the Friday before classes began, was the moment, I unknowingly missed everything Orientation had to offer. It was the day I slipped into the group of many transfer students who know nothing about anything the university has to offer us.  I was not connected on the UAlbany Transfers Facebook Page to let me know what I was missing. That page was not even created until last Spring. I had slipped through the cracks and I was lost. Coming into the university as a second, semester sophomore instead of a junior, is the day that I became a story that many other transfer students are able to resonate with. Now, I am in a position to help incoming transfer students, just like me. I am working hard to reach the goals I set for myself the first day I stepped onto this campus, because being a transfer did not break me as a student but made me a stronger one.

Click Here for the 2017
Transfer Orientation Guidebook


Next week, Jeniva will share the second part of her story. She will talk about housing, getting connected and more. Stay tuned!