The Chronicles of a Queer Afro-Latina

Fran Dom 3I grew up in an immigrant household. My parents emigrated from the Dominican Republic about twenty five years ago. Being that they both grew up in this country, they have a very specific way of viewing life. They brought their culture and traditions to this country and made it a point to immerse me and my brother in it. They raised us with the intentions of teaching us our history. My father used to make me read books on the formation and birth of the Dominican Republic. My mother made it a point to teach us how to read, write, and speak Spanish, the native language. They raised us listening to merengue, bachata and salsa, and taught us to dance. They sent us to visit our family members in the Dominican Republic every summer.  Continue reading “The Chronicles of a Queer Afro-Latina”

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The Culture Clash

culture-clashWelcome to UAlbany! I know people say NYC is a melting pot but I personally believe UAlbany is even more so. No one really has the opportunity to stay within their own exclusive group, we are all together here. This is one of the things I was most excited for when I moved here for school. I grew up in a small county where diversity was not all that prevalent, and when there was some diversity, people stuck to their own groups and didn’t really explore outside of them. I was itching to explore though. I was kind of sick and tired of hearing the same streamlined thoughts over and over again.

summer-still-life-785231_960_720As soon as I moved to Albany, I was introduced to all sorts of different cultures. There were religions I had never heard of before or even bothered to explore. There were plenty more liberals and points of views than I was used to hearing. There was music I had never heard of before and dance moves I had only seen on the television. Right now, you must think I’m crazy and live under a rock, but I can promise you, this perspective is flipped around. When I met my new friends from the city, they were shocked at the  stories of how I lived. They wondered how I got by with minimal internet or no public transportation. They wondered why the closest dance club was a 45-minute drive away. To be honest, it was rather hilarious. Continue reading “The Culture Clash”